Back
Use CasesViewtracker - Analytics for Confluence

Viewtracker Content & Usage Report: The data you have always been craving for

Viewtracker has been an invaluable Confluence analytics tool in many companies of all sizes for years (get a short feature overview). However, there have been recurring requests to make the collected data more easily available. This is especially true for Confluence content managers, who are often not comfortable juggling the raw data export themselves. We have heard many requests to have a self-service report that can be filtered in the tool itself before downloading the aggregated data.

This is why we have implemented the new Viewtracker Content & Usage Report for Cloud and on-premise. Read here the most sought-after use cases and questions this new report helps with. We will continuously adapt this page and list more use cases.

Note: The screenshots in this post are from the Cloud version. There are small visual and functional differences between the different deployments. However, the core functionality is identical for Cloud and on-premise.

Sleeping Beauty content: Content nobody knew existed

Who this is relevant for: Content editors and their managers, space managers

Why this matters: Editors usually spend a lot of time crafting their Confluence content, be it a page, a blog post or an attachment. Potential readers need to be made aware of this valuable content. This is especially true if the content was created a while ago but is still highly relevant. New employees might never have noticed this valuable information because it was not part of their onboarding.

How to access the data: In the Content&Usage Content Report:

  1. Filter for “content with fewer than x views” in 6 months (<10 views, for example)
  2. Optional: Filter the list by spaces covering HR topics, corporate values, etc.
  3. Optional: Sort the resulting table by “Last viewed”
Filter “fewer than x views”, filter by space

What to do next:

  • Promote your “oldies but goldies” pages again: Link to them, add labels, change the page title to something more relevant, share them with co-workers …
  • Turns out the content is no Sleeping Beauty at all, but actually redundant or “dead”? Then it’s time to archive or delete it. This is described in the next use case.

Dead content: Content that can be archived or deleted

Who this is relevant for: Confluence administrators, space managers, content editors, Confluence users

Why this matters: We all get overwhelmed by the sheer amount of content that accumulates in Confluence over the years. The number of search results is rising by the day, page trees are completely clogged up, and Confluence administrators are unhappy about redundant data that slows down the system. We all appreciate a regular spring cleaning of the data, but it’s hard to know where to start. Often, we must rely on opinions or have heated debates about which content should go and which should stay. With the right filters in the Content&Usage Report, we can base content decisions on numbers.

Finding unused content

How to access the data: In the Content&Usage Content Report:

  1. Filter for “content with fewer than x views” in x months (<10 views in 3 or 6 months, for example).
  2. Optional: Sort the resulting table by “Last modified”.
Filter “fewer than x views”

Finding unused spaces

Similarly, you can find “dead” spaces In the Content&Usage Spaces Report.

  1. Filter for “spaces without content edits” or “spaces without content views” in x months to only find completely abandoned spaces.
  2. Alternative: Filter for “spaces with fewer than x views” (<10 views in 6 or 12 months, for example).
  3. Optional: Sort the resulting table by “Last modified”.
Filter “spaces without content edits”

What to do next: Archive and delete the old content and abandoned spaces. This is beneficial both to the users (clean page tree, no irrelevant content in search results) and Confluence administrators (free up space, better performance).

New content that you might have missed

Who this is relevant for: Space managers, knowledge managers / wiki gardeners

Why this matters: With loads of content created every day, it is very easy to miss information relevant to you. If you are a space manager, you try to keep track of what is going on in “your” space.

How to access the data: In the Content&Usage Content Report:

  1. Filter for “newly created content” in the desired date range.
  2. Optional: Filter the results to “your” space or a few specific spaces only.
Filter “newly created content”, filter by space

What to do next: Assess this new content regularly. Share it with co-workers, link to it, add labels, check for duplicate content, move it in the page tree to a more suitable position, etc. – the options are all yours.

Popular content: Content with many views

Who this is relevant for: Content editors and their managers, knowledge managers / wiki gardeners

Why this matters: With content published constantly, you want to make sure the content reaches the right audience at the right time. Also, you may want to be informed of trending content in a particular date range, be it yesterday, this week, last month etc.

How to access the data: In the Content&Usage Content Report, filter for “content with more than x views” in the date range of your choice.

Filter “more than x views”

What to do next: Keep this popular content up to date, relevant and easy to skim. Link to related content and constantly add relevant information to keep up the user flow.

Active content: Content with many interactions

Who this is relevant for: Content editors and their managers, knowledge managers / wiki gardeners, regular Confluence users

Why this matters: Again, with the sheer amount of content constantly created, it can be hard to find the gold nuggets, i.e. the content that many users interacted with (edits, comments, etc.). You want to find out which content has the most interactions and people working together.

How to access the data: In the Content&Usage Content Report:

  1. Filter for “content with edits”.
  2. Sort the table by the number of contributors.
  3. Optional: Depending on your privacy settings, see who was involved in specific content.
Filter “content with edits”
Table sorted by “Contributors”

Active users: Users with many interactions

Who this is relevant for: Confluence administrators, managers

Why this matters: With teams getting bigger, it is relevant for Confluence administrators to know who contributes most to Confluence and who may need a little more encouragement.

How to access the data: This is the default Content&Usage Users Report. Optionally, you can filter the users by a specific user group.

Active users, sorted by number of views

What to do next:

  • Managers: Sort the table by views (default), creations, edits or comments to find the most active contributors in your team. Why not give them a shoutout at the next team meeting? Also, ask the less active users what they need to use Confluence more often and more confidentially.
  • Confluence administrators: Sort the table by least views and other interactions to find inactive users. Ask their managers if these users still need access to Confluence.

Data export and summary

Once you have filtered the data table to your heart’s content, you can export the aggregated data as a CSV file. The sort order will be retained so that the export file will look the same as your data table in the report UI.

Whenever you set a specific filter, the data summary below the table will adjust. In the Content and Spaces Report, you can tap on “See all metrics” and obtain a data summary. This can also be exported.

“All metrics summary” based on your filters (Cloud version)

Conclusion

The cases listed above are just a few of the many use cases of the new Content & Usage Report, available for Cloud & on-premise (Data Center & Server). We are happy to learn about yours! Please share any feedback via support@bitvoodoo.ch.

Ready to start digging into your Viewtracker data?